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administration is rejecting calls to plant -- grand, sita nsa leaker edward snowden. in a letter given to a german lawmaker last week, snowden called on the u.s. to drop charges against him, writing "speaking the truth is not a crime." on sunday, dan pfeiffer ruled out clemency and said snowden should return to face criminal charges. in some of the latest snowden's disclosures, the "new york times" reports the nsa intercepted the talking points of view into secretary -- you would secretary-general ban ki- moon ahead of a meeting with president obama in april. we will have more on the story with the reporter scott shane after the headlines. a newly disclosed document shows the british government justified detaining the partner journalist glenn greenwald by accusing him of espionage and terrorism. in august, david maranda was on his way home to brazil when he was held from his nine hours at london's heathrow airport. he faced repeated interrogation, had many personal items seized, .ncluding some -- thumb drives an internal police order authorizing greatest attention from that they says -
edward snowden may have information about how much cooperation european governments gave to the surveillance. >> as they wrap up meetings on capitol hill, what are they saying after the first meeting emerges. >> reporter: this is part of an european inquiry set up a few months ago. this has been long planned. the first stop at chairman of the house intelligence mike rogers who said he didn't understand what all the fuss was about, that they should be glad europe is spying on them because its keeping them safe. not much there. there is talk of ongoing dialogue but the chairman of european union foreign affairs has said confidence has been damaged. >> has anything been said that their spying headquarters have been linked so they can share the spy information. >> reporter: that's the big question, what we haven't learned from the edward snowden is the amount of cooperation from the european governments and the national security agency. this is something that they have been very concerned about. as far as world leaders who are talking about things, angela merkel and so on, yo
, edward snowden manifest tow of truth is what he is calling it. he is ghademanding the u.s. dro espionage charges against him and why he is suggesting he is is not criminal. >>> a bizarre security breach at o'hare airport. an alligator on the loose in terminal 3! what? wait, wait, wait... no, no, no, wait, wait. (baby crying) so you can deposit a check... with the touch of a finger. so you can arrange a transfer in the blink of an eye. so you can help make a bond... i got it. that lasts a lifetime. the chase mobile app. so you can. ♪ hey lady! noooo! no! [ tires screech ] ♪ nooo! nooo! nooo! hey lady, that's diesel! i know. ♪ ♪ okay, who helps you focus on your recovery? yo, yo, yo. aflac. wow. [ under his breath ] that was horrible. pays you cash when you're sick or hurt? [ japanese accent ] aflac. love it. [ under his breath ] hate it. helps you focus on getting back to normal? [ as a southern belle ] aflac. [ as a cowboy ] aflac. [ sassily ] aflac. uh huh. [ under his breath ] i am so fired. you're on in 5, duck. [ male announcer ] when you're sick or hurt, aflac pays you cash.
as the leaks keep on coming from edward snowden from the top adviser to the president about what the president knew and when he knew it. first today's trivia question. what is the most populous state with one woman in its congressional delegation. the first person to tweet the correct question will get the on air shout out. the answer and more coming up next. [ female announcer ] who are we? we are the thinkers. the job jugglers. the up all-nighters. and the ones who turn ideas into action. we've made our passions our life's work. we strive for the moments where we can say, "i did it!" ♪ we are entrepreneurs who started it all... with a signature. legalzoom has helped start over 1 million businesses, turning dreamers into business owners. and we're here to help start yours. i remember thinking there's a lot i have to do... check my blood sugar, eat better. start insulin. today i learned there's something i don't have to do anymore. my doctor said with levemir® flexpen... i don't have to use a syringe and a vial. levemir® flexpen comes prefilled with long-acting insulin taken once daily for
. >>> coming up on "new day," a few proceed from edward snowden. he says he's no criminal. wait until you hear our response from the leaders in the nation's capitol. he says he is sorry for past mistakes for smoking co-cable. he will not resign and he wants the public to see the alleged evidence. t thing i need. seriously? let's take this puppy over to midas and get you some of the good 'ol midas touch. hey you know what? i'll drive! i really didn't think this through. brakes, tires, oil, everything. (whistling) hall we do is go out to dinner.? that's it? i mean, he picks up the tab every time, which is great...what? he's using you. he probably has a citi thankyou card and gets 2x the points at restaurants. so he's just racking up points with me. some people... ugh! no, i've got it. the citi thankyou preferred card. now earn 2x the points on dining out and entertainment, with no annual fee.to apply, go to citi.com/thankyoucards american express credit card, every purchase earns you 2% cash back, which is deposited in your fidelity account. is that it? actually... there's no annual fee and no l
condition. what investigators have uncovered about a possible motive for that attack. >>> and edward snowden is out with a new manifesto and is asking for clemency from the u.s. why he basically says he did the american government a favor. that's next. i'm a careful investor. when you do what i do, you think about risk. i don't like the ups and downs of the market, but i can't just sit on my cash. i want to be prepared for the long haul. ishares minimum volatility etfs. investments designed for a smoother ride. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus, which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. if yand you're talking toevere rheuyour rheumatologistike me, about trying or adding a biologic. this is humira, adalimumab. this is humira working to help relieve my pain. this is humira helping me through the twists and turns. this is humira helping to protect my joints from further dam
.s. surveillance abroad. the material handed over to a reporter by nsa leaker edward snowden and it's providing a seemingly endless stream of revelations. those revelations are rocking america's relationships with some of its closest allies. christiane amanpour is joining us right now. you just spoke to the reporter who has been breaking all of these edward snowden leaks. what did he just tell you? >> reporter: well, first of all, they have thousands and thousands of documents but also, that he just simply rejects what, for instance, mike rogers, chairman of the house intelligence committee, british prime minister david cameron, many, many u.s. and other allied officials are saying, which is that this is dangerous, what they're doing, that they are putting all sorts of people at risk, they are compromising all sorts of abilities to close down terrorist cells and plots and this and that. he rejects that and always has. this is what he said to me on that. >> every terrorist who is capable of tying their own shoes has long known that the u.s. government and the uk government are trying to monitor
made by former nsa contractor edward snowden. he describes himself as a whistleblower, but others say he's a traitor. >> christiane amanpour has spoken with the journalist who worked closely with edward snowden to expose these secrets and joins you now from london. you had that interview with glenn greenwald. what struck you most about him, he is one determined man on a bit of a mission really. >> he continues to insist that despite the vociferous criticism that officials have leveled at the snowden leaks and at him and the press for publishing them, it is not all about terrorism. he keeps saying loorks, they want us to believe that everything that's being leaked is just about life and death terrorism. but it's not. there are a lot of other revelations, a lot of revelations about economic and commercial and industrial espionage. there are a lot of revelations obviously which started the firestorm of protests around the world. about spying and collecting metadata from ordinary citizens. that is what really drives glen green wald really, really crazy and let me play you just a little bi
controversy continues to spread. in the wakeover it, edward snowden has had a meeting with a german legislator the, present that person with a letter, speaking the truth is not a crime, i am confident that with the support of the international community the government of united states will abandon this harmful practice. he's seeking some kind of clemency. are there any conditions under which president obama would consider clemency? >> none that have been discussed. >> none at all? >> none. >> it's not on the table? >> it's not been on the table. mr. snowden violated u.s. law. our belief has always been that he should return to the united states and face justice. >> finally, rand paul is our next guest, senator rand paul, do you agree with jay carney your white house colleague, that it would be awesome if rand paul ran for president in 2016? >> i suspect that the the 2016 republican nomination is going to be awesome no matter who runs. >> okay, dan pfeiffer, thanks very much. >>> let's go to senator rand paul right there. you heard dan pfeiffer say it's going to be an awesome race. are you goin
information from whistle blower edward snowden may emerge detailing cooperation and the dragnet surveillance of citizens, if not the monitoring of leaders' phone calls. >> that delegation will be in washington until wednesday. we are also expecting delegations from the french and german intelligence agencies at some point in the coming days and weeks. the question is whether they are truly concerned about the surveillance of their citizens or the surveillance of their leaders, political and business. >> we have reports that there'll be more talks on spying held in europe. >> tens of millions of twitter users around the world are expressing their thoughts in 140 characters or less. many want to the crackdown on the growing hate speech on the social media platform. we have this story. >> twitter is becoming a favourite spot for tech-savvy hate monningers. that's according to a report by a center in international human rights. the center gave twitter an f grade when it came to policing the hate messages on its fight. >> facebook was the best to deal with issues. twitter was the worst. we. the
the leaker. >> edward snowden being the leaker. we were talking about domestic spying and snooping on americans. here you have purely foreign intelligence and suddenly that's a crime as well. it's kind of an indication of the moving goalpost. >> domestically the political back lash. there are -- >> against the nsa -- >> there's sensenbrenner in the house -- >> especially when there's legislation to stop the nsa from data collection, let the aclu basically argue why certain things shouldn't be done. and to really handcuff our intelligence services the way that it happened in the 1970s, which indirectly led up to our failures that led to 9/11. >> how big a danger is that, mary? >> well, it's, i think it's possible that, you know, you're going to get some momentum. but it's incredibly naive. i mean, you know, is this -- if the u.s. stops doing this, then it woen be happening anymore. basically if the u.s. stops doing it then the only ones doing it will be the chinese, the russians, you know, the brazilians, the cubans. and probably the germans and the french. you know, the idea that b
closest allies. the newest edward snowden documents reveal more spying on america's closest allies. spain reports the nsa listened in on 60 million phone calls in a single month. in germany, the newspaper records, president obama was briefed by nsa chief keith alexander about spying on angela merkel's calls. the nsa quickly denied the report telling cnn general sander did not discuss with president obama in 2010 an alleged foreign intelligence operation involving german chancellor merkel, nor has he ever discussed alleged operations involving murkle. the nsa says the willingness up to now to deny present and future monitoring. >> i can tell you the president can assure the chancellor, the sungs not and will not 3407b tore the conversations of the chancellor. >> reporter: they are coming to the u.s. to challenge their american counterparts, after breaking quote german law on german soil. house chairman rodgers defended the nsa under surveillance on cnn sunday saying it was both well regulated and essential to keeping both americans and europeans safe from terrorism. >> i think the biggest
that several agency across asia were part of the spying. >> edward snowden wants to help germany figure out if the u.s. tapped angela merkel's cell phone. he offered to help with the investigation and even offered to be a witness. the official says "he knows a lot." he is prepared to come to germ my and give testimony. the official says snowden insists that before coming to germany, "conditions must be discussed." he sent the a personal letter to merkel, which will be red publicly today. >> powerful storms pound the parts of ohio. >> the severe weather is expected to last through tonight, as well. ten people were injured. strong winds damages businesses and downed power lines. the storm caused flash floods on wednesday in sections of texas that left two dead. tornado warnings have been issued, high went gusts are also expected in new york and new england. >> let's bring in our meteorologist. >> very busy system here. what can we expect. >> very busy, we have close to 200 reports, five being tornadoes, close to 150 being wind reports, and also multiple reports of hail across much of the coun
to it, especially not the leaker edward snowden. the former analyst who made public so much top secret information that caused this whole controversial in the first place. the speaker you just heard was congressman peter king. he was talking about one of the suggestions being made by the committee to reform the way the nation gathers intelligence. to modify, to amend, the patriot act, so that there will be some restrictions put into place on how the information is gathering. for example, they are saying that they no longer will have a dragnet collection of phone calls. that there will be stronger restrictions on who is targeted, and there will also be a new position placed on the super secret court to protect rights and inspector general and in a privacy advocate. those are the measures that some members of the committee want to take, but some members of the committee say that they are not necessary, because our agencies are doing a great job keeping america safe. >> okay, so randall, how has the white house responded to these allegations of spying on world leaders. >> well, the white
million calls in spain in one month. documents provided by nsa leaker edward snowden. the spanish government summoned the american ambassador asking for an explanation. >>> this weekend, thousands of protesters marched on capitol hill demanding an end to the government surveillance program at home and abroad. many carried signs praising snowden and thanking him for blowing wistle on the nsa by leaking classified documents. this comes as international outrage builds over the broad scope of the nsa's data gathering over years. european leaders continue to put pressure on the country to for a new spying deal on allies. chefon, thank you so much for your time. >> thank you. >> let's explain why it is some officials have explained perhaps why the president would not know about this for five years. >> as it was explained to us, this type of surveillance is the type of program or decision that would be executed at the level of the national security agency and the way the protocols are set up at this point, that's sort of where the line of information would stop. there isn't necessarily a
an end to secrecy. first you had the wiki leaks, private manning, and now you have edward snowden who has caused and international -- an international uproar. it makes you wonder whether the government can preserve some of the secrets because there are young people who have other ideas and they are willing to take the risk of putting them out. it is an interesting and relatively new development that makes it hard. some secrets should be kept, but it is a question of degree. it looks as though the nsa was doing too much. they have to do some things, obviously. there has to be a balance between security and freedom. we could live in a police state where the government knew everything. there has to be a balance between what the government needs to do and our own freedom and civil liberties and rights. they happen to be guaranteed in a thing called the constitution of the united states. host: is glenn greenwald a journalist or an activist? guest: you have to ask him, i think he is a little bit of both. host: why do you say that? guest: he made no secret that he has a point of view. that means
to parts of new england. >> the nsa is denying reports based on documents leaked by edward snowden that it secretly broke into a main connection link that connects yahoo! and google data centers overseas. >>> the boston red sox clinched their first title home at fenway since 1918. congrats to them. >>> straight ahead, some serious questions this morning for those of you with kids who play sports. kids and concussions. a new report sounding the alarm and putting at least some of the blame directly on parents. >>> we have a quick programming note to tell you about. tomorrow and monday on "today" bernard carric speaks out. >> he sits down and talks about his release from prison and president bush's nominee for security. we'll have part one of our interview and he will join us live in our studio coming up on monday morning. >>> let's begin this half hour with a texas police officer hailed as a hero. she was shot twice, once in the face, still managed to pursue the suspects. nbc's janet chandley has more on this. good morning to you. >> reporter: hi, matt, talk about true grit, a 40-yea
's been talked about edward snowden getting clemency. he has asked for that. should he get clemency? >> no. he's not getting clemency. the fact he broke the law, he stole classified material. what i ask the question is, who has been fired at the nsa for being so sloppy, so negligent to allow a 29-year-old to allow a 29-year-old to walk away with highly classified material? nobody has to my knowledge. >> important question. senator leahy, thank you so much for your time this afternoon. we appreciate it. >>> coming up, big news at the supreme court. nbc news justice correspondent pete williams joins me next. stay with us. you're giving away pie? would you like apple or cherry? cherry. oil...or cream? definitely cream. [ male announcer ] never made with hydrogenated oil. oh, yeah. [ male announcer ] always made with real cream. the sound of reddi wip is the sound of joy. see who does good work and compare costs. it doesn't usually work that way with health care. but with unitedhealthcare, i get information on quality rated doctors, treatment options and estimates for how much i'll pay. that h
that nsa leaker edward snowden could be granted clemency. i want to bring in benjamin carden. senator carden, glad to have you here, sir. >> alex, good to be with you. >> edward snowden released what he called this manifesto for the truth. he says current debates about spying just prove his revelations are helping bring about change. what's your response to that? >> mr. snowden has caused real damage to this country. the manner in which he has conducted these releases have compromised our national security. as senator feinstein said, there's a way in which a whistleblower can get information to us. we want to make sure there's adequate oversight on the powers of the intelligence community. we need the right balance to keep us safe and protect the rights of americans. so there's concern on how we collect data, but for a person who has been given that access and trust on his own to do this type of release is detrimental to our country. >> sir, as you serve on the senate foreign relations committee, i know you're privy to things we are not necessarily. do you believe what we know so far
, but cnn chief national security correspondent jim sciutto has more. the newest edward snowden documents reveal more spying on america's closest allies. in spain, reports the nsa listened in on 60 million phone calls in a single month and in germany the "sontag" newspaper reports president obama was briefed by nsa chief keith alexander about spying on angela merkel's calls back in 2010, contradicting white house assurances the president was not aware of the extent of the surveillance. the nsa quickly denied the report telling cnn "general alexander did not discuss with president obama in 2010 an alleged foreign intelligence operation involving german chancellor merkel nor has he ever discussed alleged operations involving chancellor merkel." the nsa's denial a clear step beyond the white house's willingness up to now only to deny present and future monitoring. >> i can tell you the president assured the chancellor that the united states is not monitoring and will not monitor the communications of the chancellor. >> reporter: german intelligence officials are expected to come to the u.s.
by not allowing edward snowden to steal the documents that he stole from our country. "the guardian," is operating in its own best interest. they have inherited stolen goods, stolen information, and ind to be held accountable informing the world of these instances. what was stolen, we have tried as best we can to figure out what all he does have, but we are really at the mercy of "the guardian" as to how they roll the revelations out and how they spin them. it is a mostly inaccurate portrayal of that data. do you and the intelligence communities know exactly what he has? guest: no, he could have some stuff that we are not aware of. host: do you have an idea a echo -- id a? guest: -- idea? guest: we do in some instances, but not everything. host: they still cannot answer that question? guest: not definitively. no one can answer that question. host: how is it that that is not possible? there is a lot of it that he took over a long. of time. host: so, there is more to come? guest: i do not know, in infinite wisdom. host: kevin on twitter asks -- guest: you're caller earlier talked about the boston bo
are rejecting nsa leaker edward snowden's plea for clemency. that would give him a lesser punishment if he returns to the united states. officials said that no offers are being discusse in that s nowden should return to the united states and face charges. >> the head of the senate intelligence committee is defending the nsa. that agency is facing global criticism a claim satisfied on foreign allies. democratic senator dianne feinstein says that the nsa operates under direction of other departments. >> i believe the nsa is filled with good patriotic people who want to do the right thing. they follow the orders and that they are given. the administration controls intelligence. the national intelligence framework is put together by the administration. >> claims about the u.s. fine on allied leaders and citizens have sparked calls for the u.s. to roll back their surveillance programs. president obama has ordered a review of those programs. >> aboard is in a the united emirates are morning social media users that photos of individuals posted online without their consent could lead them to jail.
. with wicki leaks and edward snowden spilling our beans every day what's happening on the exchanges is the best-kept secret in washington, d.c. the national security agency could learn something from secretary sebelius. today i will ask consent to approve a six-page bill i introduced yesterday to require the the administration to answer these questions every week. secretary sebelius is not responsible for enacting obamacare, but she has been responsible for three and a half years for implementing it. now many americans have only a few weeks to purchase new insurance or be without health insurance. to expect the secretary to correct in a few weeks what she's not been able to do in three and a half years is unrealistic. mr. president, it's time for the president to ask the secretary of health and human services to resign. i thank the president and i yield the floor. mr. hatch: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from utah. mr. hatch: during debate over debt limit increase in 2009 -- 2006, then-senator obama stated that -- quote -- "the fact that we are here today to deba
weapons. >>> after getting his new job in russia, the nsa secrets spiller edward snowden is plotting his next move. while meeting with a german lawmaker in moscow, snowden reportedly offered to testify in germany, if he is offered asylum there. the germans want to know more of america's wiretapping of their chancellor, angela merkel's cell phone. >>> the secretary of state john kerry, admitting that some of our surveillance, quote, has gone too far. >>> this morning, shocking new numbers about the obama care rollout. take a look at this. documents released by house republicans show only six people, six, were able to enroll on health plans the day that healthcare.gov was launched. by the end of the second day, 248 people had enrolled. the white house is pushing back saying glitches on the site make early data unreliable. >>> a halloween surprise for airport security agents across the border. they stopped a woman with pumpkins in her luggage. look closely at the x-ray. they say the bags in the pumpkins, filled with cocaine. $120,000 worth. >>> caught on tape, a disaster for an auto mechani
as a liquor edward snowden is missing home. with the details in his latest appeal to u.s. officials. >>anny: welcome back. a scare at birmingham alabama's international airport just two days after the deadly shooting at lax is calling into question airport's security. how safe are you at an airport? do americans deck there's a get the nation's airports for granted? cnn's a shelby lynne explains why they shouldn't. >>: sunday afternoon off authorities evacuated the airport over a bomb threat. police say someone found a note containing a spread prompted the evacuation. it cost for cancellation of a dozen flights. birmingham police sergeant says a search at the airport turned up nothing. >>: big inconvenience to everyone involved. visitors officers. employees. >>: and may have been a big employee but the incident comes just two days after the shooting and lax. >>: it's very difficult to stop these types of attacks. anyone can show up as we saw in the navy yard with a shotgun. in this case with a semi-automatic and you know it's like a shopping mall outside the perimeter it's almost like an ope
the roots of some navy shoots. francis is accused of charging the navy fuel. >>> edward snowden wants the united states to drop charges against him. snowden has been charged with federal crimes for leaking classified documents. he releesed a -- released a letter asking for international help to persuade the u.s. authorities to let him off the hook. snowden says he would testify before congress about the nsa surveillance programs. dianne feinstein says he already had that chance. >> he had an opportunity if what he was was a whistle- blower to pick up the phone and call the house intelligence committee, the senate intelligence committee, and say, look, i have some information you ought to see. that didn't happen. >> now, the documents snowden released about the nsa's surveillance programs around the world, they've angered many u.s. allies. >>> a high-testify research company -- a high-tech research says documents released by snowden says the nsa had customer information from google, facebook, apple. reportedly this has made companies around the world wary about doing business with amer
a good point. senator dianne feinstein, pointing out that edward snowden wants the charges against against him dropped entirely and why he says that his actions are justifiable. martha: speak to any woman goes up in flames while pumping gas. we will study what happens when we come back. energy company. i can tell you - safety is at the heart of everything we do. we've added cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, whe experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. or treat gas with these after you get it. now that's like sunblock before or sun burn cream later. oh, somebody out there's saying, now i get it! take beano before and there'll be no gas. take beano before what does that first spoonful taste likok. honey bunches of oats. ching! mmmm! mmmm! mmmm! wow! it's the oats. honey. yeah. honey bunches of oats. this is a great cereal. bill: edwards noted in saying that it shows that he was justifi
. edward snowden wrote an open letter published in a german magazine. he calls it manifesto for truth. jim scuitto, what does he include? >> he tries to make the case that he's not a spy, but a whistle-blower on what he calls the global problem of mass surveillance. in this her he calls the u.s. and britain the worst offenders, and condemns them. the debate he says, quote, they wanted to avoid is now taking place in countries around the world, he wrote, instead of causes damage, the use is causing society to push for political reforms, oversight and new laws. >> i spoke to a senior state department official about this, is snowden had a legal means. he could have pursued it in the nsa, taken it up to the inspector general. if that wasn't good enough, he could have gone to court. in fact he's saying he could come back and face the charge in course. that's the legal way to pursue his case. his position, of course, is he won't get a fair trial here. >> the whole issue of u.s./iranian relations. today we saw a huge demonstration marking the 23rd anniversary of the takeover of the -- what does t
of europe's scorn. the white house can thank nsa leaker, edward snowden. president obama has had to apologize to hollande, merkel, and current and former leaders in mexico and president ruseff who even canceled a state visit to washington she was so angry. while the nsa scandal is also causing protests at home, with european allies, it could cost serious money. the european union, america's largest trading partner, is threatening to cancel pending trade talks in the u.s. >> when we're doing this in germany, france, great britain, other nations we've been allied with in fighting al qaeda, invading libya, these kinds of things just trample trust. >> the administration and its defenders say most of the spying is legitimate for the protection of the u.s. and its allies. >> so a bad guy in afghanistan can use networks in france or germany or great britain or the united states and plan operations with somebody else who may be in afghanistan, but you could still use all of those networks. >> the nsa has issued an unusual denial of one british report that said president obama had been to
as a victory by people like edward snowden and gl glenn greenwald. >> did you talk to glenn at all? it seems a narrow view when he says is angela merkel a terrorist. you hear from the obama administration side that these intelligence services do a lot more than just only try to intercept communications amongst terrorists. there's a lot more to it. >> right. exactly. a lot of it is about the economic side. a lot of it is, you know, just trying to figure out who's meeting who and what's going on. clearly since 9/11 you and i both know that the emphasis has been on trying to disrupt any kind of plots or plans or conspiracies to commit harm against the united states, either in the u.s. or around the world. and against u.s. allies. so that is why prime minister cameron and other strong u.s. allies have been very robust in their defense of this kind of data collection. we also know that, yes, angela merkel is a strong u.s. ally, but in the past, germany has had, obviously with east germany, it was a communist country, so a lot of spying was done in relation to that. its relations and its trade and
this out, maintaining relevance in the arena, it should have been better by not allowing edward snowden to steal the documents that he stole from our country. "the guardian," is operating in its own best interest. they have inherited stolen goods, stolen information, and ind to be held accountable informing the world of these instances. what was stolen, we have tried as best we can to figure out what all he does have, but we are really at the mercy of "the guardian" as to how they roll the revelations out and how they spin them. it is a mostly inaccurate portrayal of that data. do you and the intelligence communities know exactly what he has? guest: no, he could have some stuff that we are not aware of. host: do you have an idea a echo -- id a? guest: -- idea? guest: we do in some instances, but not everything. host: they still cannot answer that question? guest: not definitively. no one can answer that question. host: how is it that that is not possible? there is a lot of it that he took over a long. of time. host: so, there is more to come? guest: i do not know, in infinite wisdom. ho
operating. and the leaks which stemmed from information from former nsa contractor edward snowden just keep coming. two spanish newspapers say the nsa secretly monitored 60 million phone calls in spain just in one month. here in washington, mixed reaction from lawmakers. >> this whole notion that we're going to go after each other on what is really legitimate protection of nation/state interests, i think is disingenuous. >> we have repair work to do. >> reporter: abc news, washington. >>> congress now looking into the case against amanda knocks. two lawmakers from her state of washington holding a panel discussion on capitol hill as the retrial of knox is underway in italy without her. knox was convicted of killing her british roommate in 2009. her sentence was overturned after she served of course years. an italian court ordered a new trial. >>> a federal judge in texas has struck down a major part of the state's restrictive new abortion law. advocates say a provision requiring doctors to have admitting privileges at a hospital less than 30 miles away would have shuttered about 1/3 of the
't know about it until nsa leaker edward snowden revealed the u.s. was spying on other allies including leaders of mexico and brazil. the president says just because the nation's spy agencies are able to listen in on phone conversations doesn't necessarily mean they should. >> we give them policy direction but what we've seen over the last several years is their capacities continue to develop and expand and that's why i'm initiating now a review to make sure what they're able to do doesn't necessarily mean what they should be doing. >> reporter: the state department says the nsa spying disclosures have raised what they call a spokeswoman called significant challenges in some of these country's most important relationships and partnerships. brazil's president canceled a state visit over the snooping. jenna? jenna: worth pointing out editorial pages for conserve-leaning, liberal-leaning writers taken issue with this. some president's critics calling him the bystander president. why is that? >> reporter: the republican national committee strung together a group of problems that seemed to h
you had the wiki leaks, private manning, and now you have edward snowden who has ansed and international -- international uproar. there are young people who have other ideas and they are willing to take the risk of putting them out. it is an interesting and relatively new development that makes it hard. some secrets should be kept, but it is a question of degree. it looks as though the nsa was doing too much. they have to do some things, obviously. there has to be a balance between security and freedom. could live in a police state where the government knew everything. there has to be a balance between what the government freedom do and our own and civil liberties and rights. they happen to be guerin teed in a thing called the constitution of the united states. host: is glenn greenwald a journalist or an activist? erie: you have to ask him it i think he is a little bit of both. host: why do you say that? guest: he made no secret that he has a point of view. that means he is an activist. he was also writing for "the guardian." papers a liberal, leftish which has done som
have denied the charges against them. >>> the u.s. isn't showing any leniency toward edward snowden after he pleaded for international help and asking for the u.s. to drop spying charges against him. a german lawmaker released the letter friday following a meeting with snowden in russia. snowden said he would like to testify before congress and he would be willing to help officials in germany investigate alleged u.s. spying there. >>> honda is recalling more an 300,000 odyssey minivans to fix a problem that can cause the vehicle to break without warning. it affects the 2007 and 2008 model years. honda said the fix won't be available until next spring so it's mailing out instructions telling owners how they should drive to prevent the problem from occurring. >>> a scare for denver nuggets fans at friday night's home opener and it wasn't just the score against the trail blazers. before the game the mascot rocky was lowered from the ceiling of the pepsi center to the floor for player introductions. the fans cheered and spotlight on him but one problem. rocky was apparently unconscious
of this discussion is the source of many of these nsa disclosures, edward snowden, he's appealing to washington to stop treating him like a traitor. he made the appeal in a letter that he gave to a german politician who visited him in moscow. what do you think of snowden's request here? >> i think we've had a very important debate that's been kindled by these leaks. but i have little sympathy for mr. snowden. he's done enormous damage to the country. if he were a man of conscience as he claims to be, he would have in a civil disobedience way, face the music here at home. but he fled to those authoritarian regimes that care nothing about privacy. part of what he is doing is designed more to inflict damage on the united states than to make a cause out of privacy. >> part of that here, snowden offering to testify in germany about american eavesdropping methods. if germany grants him asylum there, what would you do to stop that? >> i hope germany won't make that decision. germany understands just as we do that we can't have people working within our intelligence community or people working within t
were talking about is how remarkable it would be that edward snowden might have known about this and barack obama didn't. then the other thing that strikes me is, you know, obviously i under that these programs are very controversial but the amount of controversy over this program is a little bit higher it seems than when we found out they were collecting bulk data on regular citizens. diane feinstein the chairman of the senate intelligence committee is outraged over this disclosure but fine with the other ones. >> what's worse to express, mike barnacle, that i think it's many world leaders that have this happen to them not just angela merkel and i wonder if that should have come out or if that creates more of a firestorm. but, again, it's not george w. bush sitting there with his head phones on listening to angela merkel's conversations, or president obama, it's very different. mike? >> but, mike, if the president knows, if he's getting this intel and if these reports are right that the white house and the state department signed off on it he knows without sitting there wi
nature of the revelation. >> reporter: edward snowden's revelation wills keep coming, says snowden's intermediary glen green wald. >> there's documents in the troef that we have pertaining to virtually every single country in europe, south america, central america, asia, and the middle east, and we intend to report most of that. >> there's a lot more to come. former and current officials say other countries, of course, also spy on us, but clearly not to the extent of the nsa's sweeping data collection. the message from europe, the targeting of friendly foreign leaders has destroyed trust with the u.s., leading some to not believe the u.s.'s claim that the president was unaware of this program until recently. >> andrea mitchell in washington. thank you. >>> we have new developments in the search for four escaped prisoners in oklahoma. two of the men are still at large. nbc's kerry sanders has details on that. good morning to you. >> well, good morning, matt. two of them remain at large, but two others were picked up. the escapees found about 20 miles from here. they're back in the j
if they will be charged. the cause is still under investigation. nsa leaker edward snowden has a message for the u.s. stop treating me like a trader. -- traitor. snowden is under temporary asylum in russia for leaking the nsa's secret playbook and faces espionage charges in the u.s. tucker. >> hey, clayton what needs to be done to prevent these kind of attacks. jonathan gillian. thank you for joining thus morning. >> good to be with you. >> i want to put up on the scene -- screen. there have been couple of shootings. gunman killed himself in houston. 2010, new orleans, one dead, one wounded and famously in los angeles 2002, two dead and three wounded. do you see a pattern here? >> well, obviously we see a pattern of individuals that are drawn to this for some reason. i'm not exactly clear why people who have rage are drawn to this. but, yeah, we definitely do see an issue with this. and i think probably one of the things that allows people to go there and do or draws them there is the access to the airport. and the importance of the airport. so they probably look at this as something that almost like a go
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